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The 5 Most Important Smart Tech Devices for Senior Safety

Posted by Social Department on

Smart home technology can go a long way toward making life better for our parents and senior loved ones, but you don’t want to waste your money on tech your loved one never bothers to use, or something that doesn’t make their lives easier or safer in any discernible way.

5 Smart Tech Devices for Senior Safety

Learn more about the five main types of smart technology devices that will make a difference in senior safety.

1. Smart home hub.

If you’re new to smart technology, then you may not yet realize that before you can start benefitting from most individual smart home products, you need to purchase a product that will get them all on the same system.

For seniors who are uncomfortable with the idea of figuring out a large number of different apps, getting a smart home assistant like Amazon Echo or Google Home will give you one product you can link all your other smart tech back to and make voice control an option for most of the products you buy.

For many seniors, being able to turn a product on and off with voice commands will be more intuitive and useful than having to find their phone, identify the right app on it and make the change through the app every time they need to use the

product.

Take some time to do your research here and consider the other types of products you’ll want and the compatible options for each before making your decision.

2. Smart home sensors.

Many families struggle with finding the right balance between giving an aging senior their independence and still making sure they get the level of care they need. Smart home sensors are a tool that can help stretch the length of time seniors can live on their own, while giving loved ones a way to keep tabs and make sure they stay safe.

Smart home sensors for seniors often have a component that makes it easy for the senior to call for help if there’s an emergency. They typically also provide a way to track ongoing activities like how often the senior moves through certain rooms or opens the refrigerator, in order to give loved ones a quick indication if their daily habits change. That way, if your loved one starts to experience depression or an illness that keeps them from being as active as usual or eating a healthy amount, you get an early notice that’s something’s awry that you should look into.

3. Smart lights.

Falls are the number one cause of injury in seniors. One-third of seniors fall every year and 2.3 million of them end up in the emergency room because of a fall. It’s a serious issue.

One way you can reduce your parent or senior loved one’s risk of a fall is to make sure good lighting is installed throughout their home and that they can always easily turn on a light from wherever they are. For that last part, that means never having to walk across a dark room to get to the light switch.

Smart lights can be turned on with a smartphone app or, if connected to a smart home assistant, with a voice command. Having an easy way to turn on the light before getting up from the couch or getting out of bed at night — without having to stumble toward an inconveniently placed switch — can make a big difference to how safe a senior is when moving through their own home after dark.

Make sure that when you are setting up smart lights for your loved one, you program them with voice commands that will be easy to remember and then train your loved one on what exactly they need to say. Remember to address “Alexa” or “Google” before each command and to use the right voice command for the specific room.

4. Smart medication dispensers.

It’s unfortunate that the time in life when you’re likely to need the most medication is also the time in life when your memory’s most likely to fail. Seniors frequently have a number of meds they have to try and remember to take at specific times throughout the day and often the stakes are high. Forgetting to take a particular pill, or taking one at the wrong time when it could interact badly with another, could lead to serious health complications.

Smart medication dispensers like MedMinder and Reminder Rosie automate the process of getting the right pills to your loved one at the right time, every day. Some smart medication products will also alert you if your loved one fails to take a med at the right time so you can step in and contact them directly about it.

5. Smart stove shutoff.

You don’t have to have an aging brain or dementia diagnosis to forget to turn off the oven from time to time. It’s easy to do and potentially really dangerous! That’s why one of the most useful smart tech items for seniors, especially any senior that likes to cook, is a smart stove shutoff device.

There are a number of smart stove shutoff products that will automatically turn the stove off if it’s been left on for too long. Some work by using a simple timer (after a certain amount of time, it goes off), some provide more sophisticated features like an automatic shutoff that’s triggered when the smoke alarm goes off, a motion detector that senses when you’re in the room and phone alerts letting you know when the stove’s been on for a while.

Whichever product you go with, installing a smart stove shutoff device can keep your loved one’s home safer, even as they continue cooking their favorite foods.

We hope that these five smart home tech devices can help you monitor your parents and help your senior loved ones stay independent longer without risking their safety.

Has your family used any of the smart tech devices for senior safety listed above? What other smart tech devices would you add to this list? We’d like to hear your suggestions in the comments below.

See original article:

https://bit.ly/2LYXMyD

 

Read more

The 5 Most Important Smart Tech Devices for Senior Safety

Posted by Social Department on

Smart home technology can go a long way toward making life better for our parents and senior loved ones, but you don’t want to waste your money on tech your loved one never bothers to use, or something that doesn’t make their lives easier or safer in any discernible way.

5 Smart Tech Devices for Senior Safety

Learn more about the five main types of smart technology devices that will make a difference in senior safety.

1. Smart home hub.

If you’re new to smart technology, then you may not yet realize that before you can start benefitting from most individual smart home products, you need to purchase a product that will get them all on the same system.

For seniors who are uncomfortable with the idea of figuring out a large number of different apps, getting a smart home assistant like Amazon Echo or Google Home will give you one product you can link all your other smart tech back to and make voice control an option for most of the products you buy.

For many seniors, being able to turn a product on and off with voice commands will be more intuitive and useful than having to find their phone, identify the right app on it and make the change through the app every time they need to use the

product.

Take some time to do your research here and consider the other types of products you’ll want and the compatible options for each before making your decision.

2. Smart home sensors.

Many families struggle with finding the right balance between giving an aging senior their independence and still making sure they get the level of care they need. Smart home sensors are a tool that can help stretch the length of time seniors can live on their own, while giving loved ones a way to keep tabs and make sure they stay safe.

Smart home sensors for seniors often have a component that makes it easy for the senior to call for help if there’s an emergency. They typically also provide a way to track ongoing activities like how often the senior moves through certain rooms or opens the refrigerator, in order to give loved ones a quick indication if their daily habits change. That way, if your loved one starts to experience depression or an illness that keeps them from being as active as usual or eating a healthy amount, you get an early notice that’s something’s awry that you should look into.

3. Smart lights.

Falls are the number one cause of injury in seniors. One-third of seniors fall every year and 2.3 million of them end up in the emergency room because of a fall. It’s a serious issue.

One way you can reduce your parent or senior loved one’s risk of a fall is to make sure good lighting is installed throughout their home and that they can always easily turn on a light from wherever they are. For that last part, that means never having to walk across a dark room to get to the light switch.

Smart lights can be turned on with a smartphone app or, if connected to a smart home assistant, with a voice command. Having an easy way to turn on the light before getting up from the couch or getting out of bed at night — without having to stumble toward an inconveniently placed switch — can make a big difference to how safe a senior is when moving through their own home after dark.

Make sure that when you are setting up smart lights for your loved one, you program them with voice commands that will be easy to remember and then train your loved one on what exactly they need to say. Remember to address “Alexa” or “Google” before each command and to use the right voice command for the specific room.

4. Smart medication dispensers.

It’s unfortunate that the time in life when you’re likely to need the most medication is also the time in life when your memory’s most likely to fail. Seniors frequently have a number of meds they have to try and remember to take at specific times throughout the day and often the stakes are high. Forgetting to take a particular pill, or taking one at the wrong time when it could interact badly with another, could lead to serious health complications.

Smart medication dispensers like MedMinder and Reminder Rosie automate the process of getting the right pills to your loved one at the right time, every day. Some smart medication products will also alert you if your loved one fails to take a med at the right time so you can step in and contact them directly about it.

5. Smart stove shutoff.

You don’t have to have an aging brain or dementia diagnosis to forget to turn off the oven from time to time. It’s easy to do and potentially really dangerous! That’s why one of the most useful smart tech items for seniors, especially any senior that likes to cook, is a smart stove shutoff device.

There are a number of smart stove shutoff products that will automatically turn the stove off if it’s been left on for too long. Some work by using a simple timer (after a certain amount of time, it goes off), some provide more sophisticated features like an automatic shutoff that’s triggered when the smoke alarm goes off, a motion detector that senses when you’re in the room and phone alerts letting you know when the stove’s been on for a while.

Whichever product you go with, installing a smart stove shutoff device can keep your loved one’s home safer, even as they continue cooking their favorite foods.

We hope that these five smart home tech devices can help you monitor your parents and help your senior loved ones stay independent longer without risking their safety.

Has your family used any of the smart tech devices for senior safety listed above? What other smart tech devices would you add to this list? We’d like to hear your suggestions in the comments below.

See original article:

https://bit.ly/2LYXMyD

 

Read more


Even a Little More Exercise Might Help Your Brain Stay Young

Posted by Brian Mcfadden on

Original Article Written By Steven Reinberg
HealthDay Reporter

Alzheimer's and dementia are not an inevitable part of normal aging, and a little exercise might help keep them at bay, a new study suggests.

The researchers found that every hour of light exercise on top of recommended weekly levels of more intense activity reduced brain aging by about a year.

"This study emphasizes the relationship we are seeing between people doing more light-intensity physical activity and also having maintained brain structures," said lead researcher Nicole Spartano.

She added that the study shows a link but does not prove that physical activity keeps the brain healthy.

"We can't be certain that physical activity is causing people to have a better brain structure," said Spartano, a research assistant professor at Boston University School of Medicine.

Though it's not clear how much exercise is needed to keep your brain in peak condition, this study suggests that the bar is lower than thought. Spartano's team suspects a moderate amount of low-intensity activity may do the trick.

For the study, Spartano and her colleagues collected data on more than 2,300 men and women, average age 53, who each wore a device to measure their physical activity. The participants were all part of the Framingham Heart Study, a long-term, ongoing cardiovascular study of residents in Framingham, Mass.

The 2018 Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans say any activity is better than none, and more than 150 minutes of moderate-to-vigorous activity per week provides the biggest health benefit.

But Spartano's team found that each extra hour of light-intensity exercise was tied to larger brain size, which represented about a year less of brain aging.

People who achieved 10,000 or more steps a day had larger brain volumes than those with less than 5,000 steps, the findings showed.

Researchers have reported that people who are active have lower odds for a variety of health problems, including heart disease, diabetes and some cancers. A healthy lifestyle may also explain healthy brain aging. The specific activity levels to ward off dementia, however, aren't clear, Spartano said.

"We don't have effective preventions or treatment solutions to address the growing public health crisis of climbing dementia rates," she said. "So focusing on lifestyle interventions, which have shown some potential benefit, are vital at this point."

The study doesn't discount moderate or vigorous physical activity as important for healthy aging.

"We are just adding to the science, suggesting that light-intensity physical activity might be important, too, especially for the brain," she said.

Dr. Sam Gandy, director of the Mount Sinai Center for Cognitive Health and NFL Neurological Care in New York City, said while researchers found a clear link between movement and benefits to brain function and volume, many questions remain unanswered.

Another expert said lifestyle is an important part of staying healthy in body and mind, and even light exercise can benefit your brain.

"The next step is to find out what that specific recipe is," said Rebecca Edelmayer, director of scientific engagement at the Alzheimer's Association.

An ongoing study is examining how heart health, exercise, diet and mental stimulation might prevent or slow development of Alzheimer's disease and other dementia, she said.

"We know that dementia and Alzheimer's disease [are] not normal aging," Edelmayer said. "There is normal aging. But trying to understand the biological underpinnings of Alzheimer's is going to be really crucial for us to be able to treat the disease."

She urged people to "get up and get moving."

"It's never too early or too late," Edelmayer said. "Taking better care of your health overall could potentially be beneficial for your brain."

The report was published online April 19 in JAMA Network Open.

More information

To learn more about keeping your brain healthy, visit the Alzheimer's Association.

Copyright © 2019 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

See original article at:

https://www.usnews.com/news/health-news/articles/2019-04-19/even-a-little-more-exercise-might-help-your-brain-stay-young

Read more

Even a Little More Exercise Might Help Your Brain Stay Young

Posted by Brian Mcfadden on

Original Article Written By Steven Reinberg
HealthDay Reporter

Alzheimer's and dementia are not an inevitable part of normal aging, and a little exercise might help keep them at bay, a new study suggests.

The researchers found that every hour of light exercise on top of recommended weekly levels of more intense activity reduced brain aging by about a year.

"This study emphasizes the relationship we are seeing between people doing more light-intensity physical activity and also having maintained brain structures," said lead researcher Nicole Spartano.

She added that the study shows a link but does not prove that physical activity keeps the brain healthy.

"We can't be certain that physical activity is causing people to have a better brain structure," said Spartano, a research assistant professor at Boston University School of Medicine.

Though it's not clear how much exercise is needed to keep your brain in peak condition, this study suggests that the bar is lower than thought. Spartano's team suspects a moderate amount of low-intensity activity may do the trick.

For the study, Spartano and her colleagues collected data on more than 2,300 men and women, average age 53, who each wore a device to measure their physical activity. The participants were all part of the Framingham Heart Study, a long-term, ongoing cardiovascular study of residents in Framingham, Mass.

The 2018 Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans say any activity is better than none, and more than 150 minutes of moderate-to-vigorous activity per week provides the biggest health benefit.

But Spartano's team found that each extra hour of light-intensity exercise was tied to larger brain size, which represented about a year less of brain aging.

People who achieved 10,000 or more steps a day had larger brain volumes than those with less than 5,000 steps, the findings showed.

Researchers have reported that people who are active have lower odds for a variety of health problems, including heart disease, diabetes and some cancers. A healthy lifestyle may also explain healthy brain aging. The specific activity levels to ward off dementia, however, aren't clear, Spartano said.

"We don't have effective preventions or treatment solutions to address the growing public health crisis of climbing dementia rates," she said. "So focusing on lifestyle interventions, which have shown some potential benefit, are vital at this point."

The study doesn't discount moderate or vigorous physical activity as important for healthy aging.

"We are just adding to the science, suggesting that light-intensity physical activity might be important, too, especially for the brain," she said.

Dr. Sam Gandy, director of the Mount Sinai Center for Cognitive Health and NFL Neurological Care in New York City, said while researchers found a clear link between movement and benefits to brain function and volume, many questions remain unanswered.

Another expert said lifestyle is an important part of staying healthy in body and mind, and even light exercise can benefit your brain.

"The next step is to find out what that specific recipe is," said Rebecca Edelmayer, director of scientific engagement at the Alzheimer's Association.

An ongoing study is examining how heart health, exercise, diet and mental stimulation might prevent or slow development of Alzheimer's disease and other dementia, she said.

"We know that dementia and Alzheimer's disease [are] not normal aging," Edelmayer said. "There is normal aging. But trying to understand the biological underpinnings of Alzheimer's is going to be really crucial for us to be able to treat the disease."

She urged people to "get up and get moving."

"It's never too early or too late," Edelmayer said. "Taking better care of your health overall could potentially be beneficial for your brain."

The report was published online April 19 in JAMA Network Open.

More information

To learn more about keeping your brain healthy, visit the Alzheimer's Association.

Copyright © 2019 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

See original article at:

https://www.usnews.com/news/health-news/articles/2019-04-19/even-a-little-more-exercise-might-help-your-brain-stay-young

Read more


Why advance care planning is important for you and your loved ones

Posted by Brian Mcfadden on

It’s vital for families to have an honest conversation about end-of-life care

By 

The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services reports that from 2002 to 2012, per person personal health care spending for the 65 and older population was $18,988, over five times higher than spending per child ($3,552) and approximately three times the spending per working-age person ($6,632).

The elderly only make up approximately 14 percent of the population but represent more than one third of the nation’s healthcare costs; one of the factors behind this disparity may be that families tend to resort to costly medical interventions to extend older family members’ lives as they age.

According to American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine chief medical officer Dr. Joseph Rotella, this figure may be influenced by families not having a thoughtful conversation about what the patient wants.

“The public and the people we care for want to have a say in their care. Many families have had the experience of a loved one who was on life support, where the family has to make painful decisions,” he said.

The best way to avoid this worst-case scenario? Tackle the difficult conversation of your loved one’s end-of-life wishes well in advance. “The only thing that can make it easier is if they know what the patient would have wanted,” Rotella said.

Starting a conversation

While there is no easy way to broach the subject of a loved one’s end of life care, including a physician in these conversations can be very helpful. Hospice or palliative care doctors and nurses can provide valuable insight into what patients and their families can expect under various scenarios, which can help your loved one make informed decisions about their wishes.

A doctor’s care planning visit can cost around $85 for a 16-30 minute session, but physicians have been able to billMedicare’s Physician Fee Schedule since 2016 to cover the cost.

Creating a document

While having a discussion between you, your loved one, and a healthcare professional is arguably the most important step for advance care planning, all of that conversation must also be recorded in a legal document called an advance healthcare directive to be helpful.

Consumers will want to focus specifically on drafting one type of advance healthcare directive called a living will, which dictates what a patient wants in terms of medical care if they are no longer able to speak for themselves in the future. This can address scenarios such as the use of dialysis or breathing machines, resuscitation orders, or organ and tissue donations if the patient passes away.

Another type of advance directive called a Durable Power of Attorney for Health Care Decisions is also important because it authorizes a surrogate to speak on the patient’s behalf if they are unable to speak for themselves.

You can learn more about advance healthcare directives by visiting this government site here.

Not just for the old or infirm

While advance care planning is especially important for older individuals or those with a chronic disease, experts say these decisions aren’t reserved just for the old or infirm.

"Ideally, advance care planning is a process that you revisit throughout your life, continually evaluating what's important to you and what your priorities are," said professor Benjamin Levi of Penn State Hershey. "As soon as someone becomes an adult, they should start thinking about these things.”

For more information on advance care planning, you visit the Center for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC) pagehere.

 

Original Article:

https://www.consumeraffairs.com/news/why-advance-care-planning-is-important-for-you-and-your-loved-ones-101817.html

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Why advance care planning is important for you and your loved ones

Posted by Brian Mcfadden on

It’s vital for families to have an honest conversation about end-of-life care

By 

The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services reports that from 2002 to 2012, per person personal health care spending for the 65 and older population was $18,988, over five times higher than spending per child ($3,552) and approximately three times the spending per working-age person ($6,632).

The elderly only make up approximately 14 percent of the population but represent more than one third of the nation’s healthcare costs; one of the factors behind this disparity may be that families tend to resort to costly medical interventions to extend older family members’ lives as they age.

According to American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine chief medical officer Dr. Joseph Rotella, this figure may be influenced by families not having a thoughtful conversation about what the patient wants.

“The public and the people we care for want to have a say in their care. Many families have had the experience of a loved one who was on life support, where the family has to make painful decisions,” he said.

The best way to avoid this worst-case scenario? Tackle the difficult conversation of your loved one’s end-of-life wishes well in advance. “The only thing that can make it easier is if they know what the patient would have wanted,” Rotella said.

Starting a conversation

While there is no easy way to broach the subject of a loved one’s end of life care, including a physician in these conversations can be very helpful. Hospice or palliative care doctors and nurses can provide valuable insight into what patients and their families can expect under various scenarios, which can help your loved one make informed decisions about their wishes.

A doctor’s care planning visit can cost around $85 for a 16-30 minute session, but physicians have been able to billMedicare’s Physician Fee Schedule since 2016 to cover the cost.

Creating a document

While having a discussion between you, your loved one, and a healthcare professional is arguably the most important step for advance care planning, all of that conversation must also be recorded in a legal document called an advance healthcare directive to be helpful.

Consumers will want to focus specifically on drafting one type of advance healthcare directive called a living will, which dictates what a patient wants in terms of medical care if they are no longer able to speak for themselves in the future. This can address scenarios such as the use of dialysis or breathing machines, resuscitation orders, or organ and tissue donations if the patient passes away.

Another type of advance directive called a Durable Power of Attorney for Health Care Decisions is also important because it authorizes a surrogate to speak on the patient’s behalf if they are unable to speak for themselves.

You can learn more about advance healthcare directives by visiting this government site here.

Not just for the old or infirm

While advance care planning is especially important for older individuals or those with a chronic disease, experts say these decisions aren’t reserved just for the old or infirm.

"Ideally, advance care planning is a process that you revisit throughout your life, continually evaluating what's important to you and what your priorities are," said professor Benjamin Levi of Penn State Hershey. "As soon as someone becomes an adult, they should start thinking about these things.”

For more information on advance care planning, you visit the Center for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC) pagehere.

 

Original Article:

https://www.consumeraffairs.com/news/why-advance-care-planning-is-important-for-you-and-your-loved-ones-101817.html

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Lottery scammers steal $18,000 worth of jewelry from elderly Florida woman

Posted by Social Department on

DAVIE, Fla. - An 80-year-old South Florida woman was robbed of more than $18,000 in jewelry by four people who promised to share lottery winnings with her, WLPG reported.

The incident began in the parking lot of a supermarket in Davie on Feb. 21, Davie police said. Four people were parked in a white Mitsubishi Outlander Sport and waited for the woman to walk toward her vehicle, which was parked in a spot reserved for handicapped drivers, the Sun-Sentinel reported.

According to police, a woman got out of the SUV and began talking with the victim, claiming she had “won a lottery and was looking for a lawyer,” the newspaper reported.

“The suspects told the victim that if she helped them, they would give her $10,000 of the lotto winnings,” police told the Sun-Sentinel.

Another man joined the conversation and corroborated the woman’s story, police told the newspaper. The suspects and the victim then drove to the victim’s home, while the other suspects in the Mitsubishi followed, WPLG reported. After arriving at the victim’s home, police said, the suspects “stole over $18,000 worth of jewelry,” the Sun-Sentinel reported.

Original article link:

https://www.kiro7.com/news/trending-now/lottery-scammers-steal-18000-worth-of-jewelry-from-elderly-florida-woman/927955081

 

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DAVIE, Fla. - An 80-year-old South Florida woman was robbed of more than $18,000 in jewelry by four people who promised to share lottery winnings with her, WLPG reported.

The incident began in the parking lot of a supermarket in Davie on Feb. 21, Davie police said. Four people were parked in a white Mitsubishi Outlander Sport and waited for the woman to walk toward her vehicle, which was parked in a spot reserved for handicapped drivers, the Sun-Sentinel reported.

According to police, a woman got out of the SUV and began talking with the victim, claiming she had “won a lottery and was looking for a lawyer,” the newspaper reported.

“The suspects told the victim that if she helped them, they would give her $10,000 of the lotto winnings,” police told the Sun-Sentinel.

Another man joined the conversation and corroborated the woman’s story, police told the newspaper. The suspects and the victim then drove to the victim’s home, while the other suspects in the Mitsubishi followed, WPLG reported. After arriving at the victim’s home, police said, the suspects “stole over $18,000 worth of jewelry,” the Sun-Sentinel reported.

Original article link:

https://www.kiro7.com/news/trending-now/lottery-scammers-steal-18000-worth-of-jewelry-from-elderly-florida-woman/927955081

 

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Hampton Senior Citizen Prom declared a success!

Posted by Social Department on

HAMPTON — Hampton High School students rolled out the red carpet Saturday for seniors from the Bear Creek Senior Activity Center.

Students organized a Hollywood Night Senior Citizen Prom at the school. The idea came about after a year-long partnership between the center and school.

“We had been doing things like Grandparents Day, Veteran’s Day Breakfast, dance lessons and oral history reports with the seniors at the center,” said Melissa Roberts, Hampton High work based learning instructor. “Our students started talking about doing this and it quickly became a full-blown prom.”

Nearly everyone in the school participated in the special evening. The culinary classes prepared the food, the jazz band played music and the fine arts students created the decorations. The school’s Student Government Association and Future Business Leaders of America members as well as Hampton Gents and Ladies Unlimited contributed to organizing and making the evening a success.

“The connection my students have made with the seniors at the center has been amazing,” Roberts said. “They love each other and have some much fun together.”

Brenda Wesley, activity center director, said she and everyone at the center are thankful for the “generosity, talent and time spent to make the evening a night to remember.”

Wesley said the relationship has made a difference in the lives of the seniors.

“It was truly amazing how everyone came together to host such a special occasion,” she said. “I’m so thankful for the time our seniors have shared with Hampton High School students.”

Wesley noted that everyone who attended the prom had a good time.

“Made my dream come true because I didn’t get to go to my prom,” said one senior. Others said it was a night they’ll never forget.

“The students were so respectful and nice,” said a prom attendee. “They showed us a wonderful time.”

See original article at:

https://www.henryherald.com/features/hampton-senior-citizen-prom-declared-a-success/article_772b013b-5486-5e17-ae31-b7b35f252ffd.html?fbclid=IwAR2p0ard7Acmu5UbJ5bE7SqHTZ43MZr8Fl_3KPQJaLz9B1u0SqJbje55j1w

 

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Hampton Senior Citizen Prom declared a success!

Posted by Social Department on

HAMPTON — Hampton High School students rolled out the red carpet Saturday for seniors from the Bear Creek Senior Activity Center.

Students organized a Hollywood Night Senior Citizen Prom at the school. The idea came about after a year-long partnership between the center and school.

“We had been doing things like Grandparents Day, Veteran’s Day Breakfast, dance lessons and oral history reports with the seniors at the center,” said Melissa Roberts, Hampton High work based learning instructor. “Our students started talking about doing this and it quickly became a full-blown prom.”

Nearly everyone in the school participated in the special evening. The culinary classes prepared the food, the jazz band played music and the fine arts students created the decorations. The school’s Student Government Association and Future Business Leaders of America members as well as Hampton Gents and Ladies Unlimited contributed to organizing and making the evening a success.

“The connection my students have made with the seniors at the center has been amazing,” Roberts said. “They love each other and have some much fun together.”

Brenda Wesley, activity center director, said she and everyone at the center are thankful for the “generosity, talent and time spent to make the evening a night to remember.”

Wesley said the relationship has made a difference in the lives of the seniors.

“It was truly amazing how everyone came together to host such a special occasion,” she said. “I’m so thankful for the time our seniors have shared with Hampton High School students.”

Wesley noted that everyone who attended the prom had a good time.

“Made my dream come true because I didn’t get to go to my prom,” said one senior. Others said it was a night they’ll never forget.

“The students were so respectful and nice,” said a prom attendee. “They showed us a wonderful time.”

See original article at:

https://www.henryherald.com/features/hampton-senior-citizen-prom-declared-a-success/article_772b013b-5486-5e17-ae31-b7b35f252ffd.html?fbclid=IwAR2p0ard7Acmu5UbJ5bE7SqHTZ43MZr8Fl_3KPQJaLz9B1u0SqJbje55j1w

 

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